Sponsorship, Partnership, Philanthropy: What’s the difference and why should I care?

Peugeot and special guests play in the CureKids charity golf tournament at The Hills

Peugeot and special guests play in the CureKids charity golf tournament at The Hill

By Kathy Cunningham, Empire PR & Events

While speaking with Grant Smith, General Manager for Sime Darby Automobiles NZ who distributes Peugeot and who are one of my clients, I was interested in learning about why he has made the decision to sponsor two very different organisations. His responses made sense. He also motivated me to do a bit more research on why companies sponsor, partner or donate.

Here’s why you should care about what you and your company sponsor.

“It’s all about brand fit and delivering value to both parties,” explains Grant Smith. “That along with providing our customers with a money can’t buy experience is what we at Peugeot care about.”

But that’s not all. As Grant continues, he explains that he and Peugeot also want to make a difference in the world and change the perception of the brand by making it accessible. Partnering with The New Zealand Ballet and CureKids has allowed them to do just that.

“Peugeot dealers in Wellington and Auckland have the chance to invite customers and special guests to attend the opening night of a NZ Ballet performance, and then go to an exclusive event with the dancers and choreographers. If we were not a partner, we could not do this.”

Grant Smith, GM with CureKids CEO and Ambassadors (Museum)

Grant Smith, GM with CureKids CEO and Ambassadors (Museum)

So, is this a partnership, sponsorship or just a donation?

“This is a partnership since we provide value to the NZ Ballet by providing Peugeot vehicles and the NZ Ballet provides value to us by giving our customers the royal treatment each time they attend a performance.”

But, isn’t this what sponsorship is all about? A win-win situation? Well, not according to the Director of Forward Thinking, Ray Comeau who believes that when he ‘sponsors’ an event, he achieves a specific marketing goal – say, reaching an audience he would not have had the chance to. But, when he enters into a ‘partnership’ agreement, it is long term (3 to 10 years) and expects to receive more than a sponsor.

I’m not convinced by Ray with his philosophy, so I did more research!

Kim Skildum Reid is a recognised expert in sponsorship and believes in a win-win-win situation. It is a win for the sponsor, the organisation and most importantly for the consumer. Now, this I like since for a very long time we have taught and implemented the win-win scenario. With the end user now in the forefront of our thinking, it has made sponsorship a whole lot more interesting.

If you want to learn about the win-win-win scenario as well as a case study on the Peugeot partnership with CureKids and The New Zealand Ballet, please register today for the PRINZ Events; Strategy, Sponsorship and Crisis Management course. Details here.

One thought on “Sponsorship, Partnership, Philanthropy: What’s the difference and why should I care?

  1. Pingback: Sponsorship, Partnership, Philanthropy: What’s the difference and why should I care? « PR Central « Charity Spring

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